1. sendychancy:

    It’s time for a new video!! Learn to make one of our most requested dishes: Haitian Black Rice (Du Riz Djon Djon)
    Click here and watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fwDYPevmKo
    And as always please subscribe, like, comment and share! Thank you!!!

    Reblogged from: sendychancy
  2. technicolorsideshow:

Thank you to @kool_ing of cornbreadandcremasse.com for featuring this young Haitian! #press #haitian #teamsakpase

    technicolorsideshow:

    Thank you to @kool_ing of cornbreadandcremasse.com for featuring this young Haitian! #press #haitian #teamsakpase

    Reblogged from: technicolorsideshow
  3. bebescliche:

    Reblogged from: bebescliche
  4. clairmuzikglobal:

A glimpse of the ‘Carnaval Des Fleurs’ in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti
July 27th - July 29th 2014 “Se La Pou’w La”

    clairmuzikglobal:

    A glimpse of the ‘Carnaval Des Fleurs’ in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti

    July 27th - July 29th 2014 “Se La Pou’w La”

    Reblogged from: clairmuzikglobal
  5. latinocaribbeanartists:

Louisiane Saint Fleurant (1924-2005) was a Haitian painter and one of the founders of the Saint-Soleil art movement. 

In 1972 she began working as a cook in the art colony of Saint-Soleil in the mountains above Petionville. Inspired by the art she saw around her, she began to paint, and eventually became one of the best-known of the Saint-Soleil painters. She also made and painted small ceramic figures which she sold from her modest house on the Rue Magny, bordering the Petionville market. In 1989 she was a founding member of “Cinq Soleils”, a group that included former Saint Soleil artists Prospere Pierre-Louis, Levoy Exil, Denis Smith and Dieuseul Paul. The early 1990’s were marked by personal tragedy as three of her children died in a five year period , including her son Stivenson Magloire who was an internationally known painter. He was stoned to death by personal enemies on October 9, 1994 during the chaos surrounding the return of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Stivenson was 31 years old. Her one surviving son, Ramphis Magloire, is also a well-known painter as is one of her daughters, Magda Magloire. Louisianne suffered a stroke around 1997 but recovered sufficiently to resume painting her brightly colored pointilistic portraits of people and vodou spirits.

[x]

    latinocaribbeanartists:

    Louisiane Saint Fleurant (1924-2005) was a Haitian painter and one of the founders of the Saint-Soleil art movement. 

    In 1972 she began working as a cook in the art colony of Saint-Soleil in the mountains above Petionville. Inspired by the art she saw around her, she began to paint, and eventually became one of the best-known of the Saint-Soleil painters. She also made and painted small ceramic figures which she sold from her modest house on the Rue Magny, bordering the Petionville market. In 1989 she was a founding member of “Cinq Soleils”, a group that included former Saint Soleil artists Prospere Pierre-Louis, Levoy Exil, Denis Smith and Dieuseul Paul. The early 1990’s were marked by personal tragedy as three of her children died in a five year period , including her son Stivenson Magloire who was an internationally known painter. He was stoned to death by personal enemies on October 9, 1994 during the chaos surrounding the return of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Stivenson was 31 years old. Her one surviving son, Ramphis Magloire, is also a well-known painter as is one of her daughters, Magda Magloire. Louisianne suffered a stroke around 1997 but recovered sufficiently to resume painting her brightly colored pointilistic portraits of people and vodou spirits.

    [x]

    Reblogged from: latinocaribbeanartists
  6. boogieliketai:

Preview of the products available from #MaisonKreyol by Anne-Laure Saint-Louis: #handcrafted wooden bottle holder, holds standard 750ml rum/wine/vodka bottle. $40 (shipping included). Portion of sales will be reinvested into providing better materials and working conditions for our partners: the #artisans who #create the products we sell on their behalf. #MadeInHaiti #ArtisanaHaitien #BuyHaitian #FabriquéEnHaiti #Haiti #Ayiti

    boogieliketai:

    Preview of the products available from #MaisonKreyol by Anne-Laure Saint-Louis: #handcrafted wooden bottle holder, holds standard 750ml rum/wine/vodka bottle. $40 (shipping included). Portion of sales will be reinvested into providing better materials and working conditions for our partners: the #artisans who #create the products we sell on their behalf. #MadeInHaiti #ArtisanaHaitien #BuyHaitian #FabriquéEnHaiti #Haiti #Ayiti

    Reblogged from: boogieliketai
  7. artdream:

    Rhum Vieux Labbé, The Haitian Rhum that will surprise you

    Reblogged from: artdream
  8. artdream:

    Haiti c.1975

    Reblogged from: artdream
  9. tisamy2k:

••• Lakay Se Lakay •••  ———————————————————- #haiti #ayiti #sketch  #selapouwla #experienceit #lakayselakay #caribbean #islandlife (at Ayiti Cherie)

    tisamy2k:

    ••• Lakay Se Lakay •••
    ———————————————————-
    #haiti #ayiti #sketch
    #selapouwla #experienceit #lakayselakay #caribbean #islandlife (at Ayiti Cherie)

    Reblogged from: tisamy2k
  10. artdream:

Flower Vendor Port-au-Prince, Haiti c. 1960

    artdream:

    Flower Vendor
    Port-au-Prince, Haiti c. 1960

    Reblogged from: artdream
  11. artdream:

    Haitian Police Officer

    Reblogged from: artdream
  12. artdream:

    If you are of country, if you are born there, then you have it in your eyes, your skin, your hands, with the hair of its trees, the flesh of its soil, the bones of its stones, the blood of its rivers, its sky, its taste, it’s men and women. - Jacques Roumain
    Masters of the Dew

    Reblogged from: artdream
  13. haitianphoenix:

"Haiti has a strong presence in Cuba, dating back to the late 1790’s after the Haitian revolution, when many French moved to Cuba and took their kidnapped Africans with them.  From this wave we get the Tumba Francesa and the Haitian roots music in Cuba.   Haitian tradition contains a strong strain of Dahomey and Congo, both of which are present in western Cuba as well.  Haitian Rada is Cuban Arara, the Dahomey tradition.

During the early part of the 1900’s, many Haitians were brought in to cut sugar cane. In 1921 and again in 1937, when the market for sugar fell, they were simply kicked out and sent home, such was the logic of the neocolonial republic.

More recently, Cuba is perhaps the only country to have welcomed so many Haitians fleeing the persecution of the Haitian elites and their regimes.  There are reportedly over 300,000 recent arrivals in Cuba.  And Creole, which is still spoken by descendants of the earlier waves, is Cuba’s second language, with a Creole radio station in Havana.” #haiti
#haitiansbelike #ayiti
#ayibobo #cuba #africa #history #knowthyself #knowyourhistory #haitianphoenix #love #me #roots #sakpasse #slavery #revolution

    haitianphoenix:

    "Haiti has a strong presence in Cuba, dating back to the late 1790’s after the Haitian revolution, when many French moved to Cuba and took their kidnapped Africans with them.  From this wave we get the Tumba Francesa and the Haitian roots music in Cuba.   Haitian tradition contains a strong strain of Dahomey and Congo, both of which are present in western Cuba as well.  Haitian Rada is Cuban Arara, the Dahomey tradition.

    During the early part of the 1900’s, many Haitians were brought in to cut sugar cane. In 1921 and again in 1937, when the market for sugar fell, they were simply kicked out and sent home, such was the logic of the neocolonial republic.

    More recently, Cuba is perhaps the only country to have welcomed so many Haitians fleeing the persecution of the Haitian elites and their regimes.  There are reportedly over 300,000 recent arrivals in Cuba.  And Creole, which is still spoken by descendants of the earlier waves, is Cuba’s second language, with a Creole radio station in Havana.” #haiti
    #haitiansbelike #ayiti
    #ayibobo #cuba #africa #history #knowthyself #knowyourhistory #haitianphoenix #love #me #roots #sakpasse #slavery #revolution

    Reblogged from: haitianphoenix
  14. haitianphoenix:

"With the European powers engaged in World War I, President Woodrow Wilson feared that Germany might occupy Haiti and threaten the sea route to the Panama Canal. To protect U.S. interests and to restore order, the president sent 330 marines and sailors to Haiti.
The last marines did not leave Haiti until 1934. To ensure repayment of Haiti’s debts, the United States took over the collection of customs duties. Americans also arbitrated disputes, distributed food and medicine, censored the press, and ran military courts. In addition, the United States helped build about a thousand miles of unpaved roads and a number of agricultural and vocational schools, and trained the Haitian army and police. It also helped to replace a government led by blacks with a government headed by mulattoes. The U.S. forced the Haitians to adopt a new constitution which gave American businessmen the right to own land in Haiti. While campaigning for vice president in 1920, Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had served as assistant secretary of the Navy in the Wilson Administration, later boasted, “I wrote Haiti’s Constitution myself, and if I do say it, it was a pretty good little Constitution.”
Many Haitians resisted the American occupation. In the fall of 1918, Charlemagne Peralte, a former Haitian army officer, launched a guerrilla war against the U.S. Marines to protest a system of forced labor imposed by the United States to build roads in Haiti. In 1919, he was captured and killed by U.S. Marines, and his body was photographed against a door with a crucifix and a Haitian flag as a lesson to others. During the first five years of the occupation, American forces killed about 2,250 Haitians. In December 1929, U.S. Marines fired on a crowd of protesters armed with rocks and machetes, killing 12 and wounding 23. The incident stirred international condemnation and ultimately led to the end of the American occupation.”  #haiti #ayiti #knowthyself #knowyourhistory #teamhaiti #teamayiti #ayibobo #unitedstates #wealth #history #theydontteachthis #haitiansbelike #sakpasse

    haitianphoenix:

    "With the European powers engaged in World War I, President Woodrow Wilson feared that Germany might occupy Haiti and threaten the sea route to the Panama Canal. To protect U.S. interests and to restore order, the president sent 330 marines and sailors to Haiti.

    The last marines did not leave Haiti until 1934. To ensure repayment of Haiti’s debts, the United States took over the collection of customs duties. Americans also arbitrated disputes, distributed food and medicine, censored the press, and ran military courts. In addition, the United States helped build about a thousand miles of unpaved roads and a number of agricultural and vocational schools, and trained the Haitian army and police. It also helped to replace a government led by blacks with a government headed by mulattoes. The U.S. forced the Haitians to adopt a new constitution which gave American businessmen the right to own land in Haiti. While campaigning for vice president in 1920, Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had served as assistant secretary of the Navy in the Wilson Administration, later boasted, “I wrote Haiti’s Constitution myself, and if I do say it, it was a pretty good little Constitution.”

    Many Haitians resisted the American occupation. In the fall of 1918, Charlemagne Peralte, a former Haitian army officer, launched a guerrilla war against the U.S. Marines to protest a system of forced labor imposed by the United States to build roads in Haiti. In 1919, he was captured and killed by U.S. Marines, and his body was photographed against a door with a crucifix and a Haitian flag as a lesson to others. During the first five years of the occupation, American forces killed about 2,250 Haitians. In December 1929, U.S. Marines fired on a crowd of protesters armed with rocks and machetes, killing 12 and wounding 23. The incident stirred international condemnation and ultimately led to the end of the American occupation.”
    #haiti #ayiti #knowthyself #knowyourhistory #teamhaiti #teamayiti #ayibobo #unitedstates #wealth #history #theydontteachthis #haitiansbelike #sakpasse

    Reblogged from: haitianphoenix
  15. moisealex:

#sunrise #tropical #haiti #lakayanm #okap #nofilter (à Cap-Haïtien (Haiti))

    moisealex:

    #sunrise #tropical #haiti #lakayanm #okap #nofilter (à Cap-Haïtien (Haiti))

    Reblogged from: moisealex
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