1. Kehinde Wiley’s Latest Work Features Stunning Portraits of Haitians
While Wiley’s been traveling the world, he’s captured residents of each country he visits. His latest exhibit, World Stage: Haiti, features Haitian residents and will be shown at Roberts & Tilton gallery in Los Angeles from September 13th through October 25th. - For Harriet

    Kehinde Wiley’s Latest Work Features Stunning Portraits of Haitians

    While Wiley’s been traveling the world, he’s captured residents of each country he visits. His latest exhibit, World Stage: Haiti, features Haitian residents and will be shown at Roberts & Tilton gallery in Los Angeles from September 13th through October 25th. - For Harriet

  2. Amour Creole/BET -  A 25-year-old restaurant owner was recently crowned Miss Haiti on Sunday in the Caribbean country’s capital of Port-au-Prince.
As the crowd of more than 400 people chanted her name and gave her a standing ovation, a crowned Carolyn Desert repeatedher vows: “I’m going to support the youth. I’m going to support women. I’m going to support the poor.”
Among Desert’s winning traits was her reputation for supporting artists and helping impoverished children and her wide smile, which earned her a “most photogenic” award, AP reports. 
Another big moment of the night for Desert occurred during the question-and-answer portion of the pageant. According to the AP, Desert said that Haitian women have more to offer than looks: “Perseverance, courage, resilience.” Her eloquent response reportedly garnered a huge round of applause.
Desert’s closely cropped natural hair also sparked a national debate about whether competitors should embrace their natural hair instead of wearing hair extensions or straight hair like a majority of the 21 pageant participants.
As Miss Haiti 2014, Desert will compete in the Miss World competition in London in December and represent the nation on trips sponsored by Haiti’s tourism ministry.

    Amour Creole/BET -  A 25-year-old restaurant owner was recently crowned Miss Haiti on Sunday in the Caribbean country’s capital of Port-au-Prince.

    As the crowd of more than 400 people chanted her name and gave her a standing ovation, a crowned Carolyn Desert repeatedher vows: “I’m going to support the youth. I’m going to support women. I’m going to support the poor.”

    Among Desert’s winning traits was her reputation for supporting artists and helping impoverished children and her wide smile, which earned her a “most photogenic” award, AP reports.

    Another big moment of the night for Desert occurred during the question-and-answer portion of the pageant. According to the AP, Desert said that Haitian women have more to offer than looks: “Perseverance, courage, resilience.” Her eloquent response reportedly garnered a huge round of applause.

    Desert’s closely cropped natural hair also sparked a national debate about whether competitors should embrace their natural hair instead of wearing hair extensions or straight hair like a majority of the 21 pageant participants.

    As Miss Haiti 2014, Desert will compete in the Miss World competition in London in December and represent the nation on trips sponsored by Haiti’s tourism ministry.

  3. HAITI UNCOVERED BOOK REVEALED

    TRAVEL JOURNAL AND COOK BOOK FROM CHEF AND CULINARY CURATOR

    DELECTABLE FOOD ART WITH ORIGINAL HAITIAN RECIPES FOR THE AMERICAN FAMILY
     

    (August 19th, 2014—New York, NEW YORK)Foreword by New York Times bestselling authorEdwidge Dandicat, HAITI UNCOVERED: A Regional Adventure into the Art of Haitian Cuisine by ChefNadege Fleurimond is a culinary coffee table book that embraces every region and tradition of Haiti.HAITI UNCOVERED  will delve into the art of Haitian Cuisine and will bring into focus the beauty of Haiti through its diverse culinary traditions while offering to Haitians and non-Haitians an opportunity to explore and learn. The beautifully bound and illustrated, hard cover book, slated to be released on November 18th, 2014, will present and represent the dishes, recipes and cooking traditions, from all the 10 geographical Departments.

    Fleurimond traveled through multiple cities in Haiti such as Port-Au-Prince, Jacmel , Gonaives, and Cap Haitien among others to absorb and discover the nuances  that are inherit in the rich and diverse culture of Haiti. One of the ways to learn about any background that is often unknown is to get to know it one on one, breaking bread, and learn about the culture through one of the most social and yet intimate way…the food. Fleurimond showcased that through her journey in the diverse provinces of her own country and to find a bit of you through her culinary journey. Manje ya pare” Food is ready!

  4. Tensions rise in Haiti after court orders Aristide to testify in criminal case

    "Former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide’s supporters clashed with United Nations peacekeepers on Thursday after a magistrate issued a summons requiring the twice-overthrown leader to provide testimony in a criminal investigation. Court papers indicated the case involved alleged laundering of drug money. About 150 people erected barricades of burning tires outside Aristide’s home to prevent his arrest." [Associated Press]

  5. artdream:

    Mawon is the Haitian Kreyòl word for maroon, meaning “escaped slave”.

    The French encountered many forms of slave resistance during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The African slaves that fled to remote mountainous areas were called mawon. The mawon formed close-knit communities which practiced small-scale agriculture and hunting. Mawons were known for sneaking back to their plantations to free family members and friends. They also joined the Taino settlements on a few occasions, who escaped the Spanish in the seventeenth century. Certain mawon factions became formidable enough that they made treaties with local colonial authorities, sometimes negotiating their own independence in exchange for helping to hunt down other escaped slaves.

    Other slave resistance efforts against the French plantation system were more direct. The mawon leader Mackandal (Muslim) led an unsuccessful movement to poison the drinking water of the plantation owners in the 1750s. Another mawon named Boukman (Muslim) declared war on the French plantation owners in 1791, sparking off the Haïtian Revolution.

    Reblogged from: artdream
  6. haitianhistory:

Did you know?
Only a few months before the Leclerc expedition, Toussaint Louverture’s own nephew and a group of former slaves led an uprising known as the Moïse rebellion.
While slavery was indeed abolished in Saint-Domingue by this point, Toussaint’s harsh work code and rumours that he would import new workers from Africa (hence, a return to the ancien régime) led many of the nouveaux libres to the conclusion that Louverture was in fact going to bring back slavery. As noted by Carolyn Fick, despite all the work he had done to secure general emancipation, by 1801, Louverture had greatly distanced himself from his former support base and did not embody their dreams of freedom as his own nephew, who promised the parcelling out of land, did (Fick, 209). Realizing the scale of the rebellion ahead of him, Louverture was in no mood for games nor was he going to accept this challenge to his authority. The rebellion was severely repressed and Moïse was executed for treason in November 1801. (Source)

    haitianhistory:

    Did you know?

    Only a few months before the Leclerc expedition, Toussaint Louverture’s own nephew and a group of former slaves led an uprising known as the Moïse rebellion.

    While slavery was indeed abolished in Saint-Domingue by this point, Toussaint’s harsh work code and rumours that he would import new workers from Africa (hence, a return to the ancien régime) led many of the nouveaux libres to the conclusion that Louverture was in fact going to bring back slavery. As noted by Carolyn Fick, despite all the work he had done to secure general emancipation, by 1801, Louverture had greatly distanced himself from his former support base and did not embody their dreams of freedom as his own nephew, who promised the parcelling out of land, did (Fick, 209). Realizing the scale of the rebellion ahead of him, Louverture was in no mood for games nor was he going to accept this challenge to his authority. The rebellion was severely repressed and Moïse was executed for treason in November 1801. (Source)

    Reblogged from: haitianhistory
  7. tifanmkreyol:

    My country is beautiful! Check out Ithamar’s “Peyi’m Se Pa’m (Official Lyric Video)”

    Reblogged from: tifanmkreyol
  8. artdream:

Straw Basket Sellers, Haiti c.1953

    artdream:

    Straw Basket Sellers, Haiti c.1953

    Reblogged from: artdream
  9. ernestraymond:

#Haiti is full of #history (at Citadelle, Haiti)

    ernestraymond:

    #Haiti is full of #history (at Citadelle, Haiti)

    Reblogged from: ernestraymond
  10. ernestraymond:

I can feel you #Haiti (at Citadelle, Haiti)

    ernestraymond:

    I can feel you #Haiti (at Citadelle, Haiti)

    Reblogged from: ernestraymond
  11. haitian-all-starz:

Haiti won it’s first Polo competition Trophy.   #haiti

    haitian-all-starz:

    Haiti won it’s first Polo competition Trophy. #haiti

    Reblogged from: haitian-all-starz
  12. haitianphoenix:

"Haiti and Carnival have struck a deal to develop a resort on the Ile de la Tortue (Tortuga Island).

Prime Minister Lamothe later tweeted that Carnival will initially invest $70 million into the development.

Tortuga is a very popular place in Haiti for tourism. In the 17th century, it was a major center of Caribbean piracy. Some say that it is synonymous with the Pirates of the Caribbean. There are many people in Haiti excited by the news.

But the devil is in the details. Will this be a private island for the exclusive benefit of Carnival and its passengers? Will this be a lease similar to the 260 acres of prime waterfront property (Labadee) which Royal Caribbean leased (ripped off) from Haiti?

Will Haitians really be employed? Royal Caribbean initially employed only Europeans on its private resort in Ladadee.  

Will a pier be developed which can accommodate giant cruise ships? This would involve substantial dredging and environmental destruction to a beautiful, pristine area. 

The Haiti Internet Newsletter covered the story. There are interesting comments to the article, including this one which was spot on:

It is very likely going to be private on long term lease, run by them, not much employment for Haitians and we’ll never know how much they are polluting the environment on and around the island since it’s probably a long term lease with all kind of exclusions since they will basically own it for the terms on the lease.

Unlike so many, I’m not having a party over this. I know the cruise industry too well to trust that this is going to benefit Haiti in any significant way. I can guarantee you Carnival is getting more out of this than Haiti ever will.

Cruise lines like Carnival and Royal Caribbean are inherently predatory. Let’s hope that Prime Minister Lamothe has his eyes wide open while dealing with Carnival.” #haiti #carnivalcruise #ayiti #ayibobo #teamayiti #teamhaiti #wealth #blackhistory #haitianphoenix #love #me #africa #exploitation or #help #cruise #royalcaribbean #labadee #haitiansbelike #education

    haitianphoenix:

    "Haiti and Carnival have struck a deal to develop a resort on the Ile de la Tortue (Tortuga Island).

    Prime Minister Lamothe later tweeted that Carnival will initially invest $70 million into the development.

    Tortuga is a very popular place in Haiti for tourism. In the 17th century, it was a major center of Caribbean piracy. Some say that it is synonymous with the Pirates of the Caribbean. There are many people in Haiti excited by the news.

    But the devil is in the details. Will this be a private island for the exclusive benefit of Carnival and its passengers? Will this be a lease similar to the 260 acres of prime waterfront property (Labadee) which Royal Caribbean leased (ripped off) from Haiti?

    Will Haitians really be employed? Royal Caribbean initially employed only Europeans on its private resort in Ladadee.  

    Will a pier be developed which can accommodate giant cruise ships? This would involve substantial dredging and environmental destruction to a beautiful, pristine area. 

    The Haiti Internet Newsletter covered the story. There are interesting comments to the article, including this one which was spot on:

    It is very likely going to be private on long term lease, run by them, not much employment for Haitians and we’ll never know how much they are polluting the environment on and around the island since it’s probably a long term lease with all kind of exclusions since they will basically own it for the terms on the lease.

    Unlike so many, I’m not having a party over this. I know the cruise industry too well to trust that this is going to benefit Haiti in any significant way. I can guarantee you Carnival is getting more out of this than Haiti ever will.

    Cruise lines like Carnival and Royal Caribbean are inherently predatory. Let’s hope that Prime Minister Lamothe has his eyes wide open while dealing with Carnival.” #haiti #carnivalcruise #ayiti #ayibobo #teamayiti #teamhaiti #wealth #blackhistory #haitianphoenix #love #me #africa #exploitation or #help #cruise #royalcaribbean #labadee #haitiansbelike #education

    Reblogged from: haitianphoenix
  13. kiskeacity:

#Repost from @sebastiennarcisse with @repostapp

—-

#miragoane #wheretheroadmeetstheocean #shootingthrutherearshield #notsocleanshied #boat #haiti #ayiti

    kiskeacity:

    #Repost from @sebastiennarcisse with @repostapp —- #miragoane #wheretheroadmeetstheocean #shootingthrutherearshield #notsocleanshied #boat #haiti #ayiti

    Reblogged from: kiskeacity
  14. artdream:

    Paintings by the reknown Haitian artist Emilcar Similien better known as Simil.

    Reblogged from: artdream
  15. artdream:

    Port-au-Prince, Haiti c.1928

    Reblogged from: artdream
Next

Sonje Ayiti

Paper theme built by Thomas