1. haitianphoenix:

"Haiti has a strong presence in Cuba, dating back to the late 1790’s after the Haitian revolution, when many French moved to Cuba and took their kidnapped Africans with them.  From this wave we get the Tumba Francesa and the Haitian roots music in Cuba.   Haitian tradition contains a strong strain of Dahomey and Congo, both of which are present in western Cuba as well.  Haitian Rada is Cuban Arara, the Dahomey tradition.

During the early part of the 1900’s, many Haitians were brought in to cut sugar cane. In 1921 and again in 1937, when the market for sugar fell, they were simply kicked out and sent home, such was the logic of the neocolonial republic.

More recently, Cuba is perhaps the only country to have welcomed so many Haitians fleeing the persecution of the Haitian elites and their regimes.  There are reportedly over 300,000 recent arrivals in Cuba.  And Creole, which is still spoken by descendants of the earlier waves, is Cuba’s second language, with a Creole radio station in Havana.” #haiti
#haitiansbelike #ayiti
#ayibobo #cuba #africa #history #knowthyself #knowyourhistory #haitianphoenix #love #me #roots #sakpasse #slavery #revolution

    haitianphoenix:

    "Haiti has a strong presence in Cuba, dating back to the late 1790’s after the Haitian revolution, when many French moved to Cuba and took their kidnapped Africans with them.  From this wave we get the Tumba Francesa and the Haitian roots music in Cuba.   Haitian tradition contains a strong strain of Dahomey and Congo, both of which are present in western Cuba as well.  Haitian Rada is Cuban Arara, the Dahomey tradition.

    During the early part of the 1900’s, many Haitians were brought in to cut sugar cane. In 1921 and again in 1937, when the market for sugar fell, they were simply kicked out and sent home, such was the logic of the neocolonial republic.

    More recently, Cuba is perhaps the only country to have welcomed so many Haitians fleeing the persecution of the Haitian elites and their regimes.  There are reportedly over 300,000 recent arrivals in Cuba.  And Creole, which is still spoken by descendants of the earlier waves, is Cuba’s second language, with a Creole radio station in Havana.” #haiti
    #haitiansbelike #ayiti
    #ayibobo #cuba #africa #history #knowthyself #knowyourhistory #haitianphoenix #love #me #roots #sakpasse #slavery #revolution

    Reblogged from: haitianphoenix
  2. artdream:

    Haitian Art

    Reblogged from: artdream
  3. haitianhistory:

    Portraits of some elite Haitian women in the late 19th and early 20th century. CIDIHCA Archives.

    Reblogged from: haitianhistory
  4. haitianhistory:

Haitian History on Tumblr is looking for Affiliates!
Hello, we are (again) revamping this blog and are looking for affiliates! If you are interested and own a serious blog/website on Haitian, Caribbean, Latin American or just broader history, please contact us in our inbox or at haitianhistoryblog@gmail.com. - Much thanks!

    haitianhistory:

    Haitian History on Tumblr is looking for Affiliates!

    Hello, we are (again) revamping this blog and are looking for affiliates! If you are interested and own a serious blog/website on Haitian, Caribbean, Latin American or just broader history, please contact us in our inbox or at haitianhistoryblog@gmail.com. - Much thanks!

    Reblogged from: haitianhistory
  5. haitianhistory:

The many children of Haitian diplomat and poet George Sylvain. (From left to right) Suzanne, Normil, Henry, Madeleine, Jeanne, Yvonne, and Pierre. Paris, 1912. Image Credit. 
The Sylvain children all grew up to occupy important functions in Haiti, most notably the sisters. They were involved in various intellectual and social work and most noticeably in early feminist activities. Indeed, by 1934, Madeleine Sylvain founded the Ligue Féminine d’Action Sociale (Women’s League for Social Action). one of the earliest feminist and women’s groups in Haiti.

    haitianhistory:

    The many children of Haitian diplomat and poet George Sylvain. (From left to right) Suzanne, Normil, Henry, Madeleine, Jeanne, Yvonne, and Pierre. Paris, 1912. Image Credit.

    The Sylvain children all grew up to occupy important functions in Haiti, most notably the sisters. They were involved in various intellectual and social work and most noticeably in early feminist activities. Indeed, by 1934, Madeleine Sylvain founded the Ligue Féminine d’Action Sociale (Women’s League for Social Action). one of the earliest feminist and women’s groups in Haiti.

    Reblogged from: haitianhistory
  6. H aiti History 101: Haiti’s Role in Ending Slavery and Aiding Independence in Countries of South America


    Mr. Robert T. Hill, quoted in Historical Records and Studies, Volume 13 compiled by the United States Catholic Historical Society said this in 1888:

    Whatever may be said against the Haitians, it should be remembered that these people nearly a century ago instituted the movement which ending in Brazil in 1860 resulted in driving the institution of slavery from the Western hemisphere.

    What movement is he referring to?

    At the time the former French colony Saint-Domingue became Haiti in 1804, slavery was still thriving in countries in South America, and territories like Venezuela, Colombia, Peru, Chile, modern Bolivia were under Spanish rule. According to Jacques Nicolas Leger, on December 15, 1815 revolutionary Simon Bolivar landed in Aux Cayes, after being defeated in Carthagena by the Spaniards

    Click link to read more

  7. haitianhistory:

    TIMELINE OF HAITIAN HISTORY

    The following list regroups some of the most important dates in Haitian history. Other important instances (such as the complete chronology of the Haitian Revolution) have been omitted to make this list more comprehensible. (Furthermore, this outlined timeline does not go beyond the end of the Duvalierist Regime.) References provided at this end of this page should be used for a fuller analysis of the dates presented. This document ought to be regarded as an introductory tool.

    Timeline 

    1492-1500: European arrival to Hispaniola (present day Haiti and Dominican Republic); island inhabited by Taino Arawak population 

    1492-1560s: Steady decline of Taino population, + or – 86% of population dies within few decades of European contact (original population estimate vary from + or – 1 million to 3.77 million in 1492, to a scarce dozens by the 1560s)

    1502: Introduction of first African slaves

    1521: First slave revolt in the New World 

    1600s: Rise of French Flibustiers culture on Spanish territory 

    1664: French West Indian Company administers island of Tortuga

    1685: Louis XIV’s Code Noir issued

    1697: Treaty of Ryswick, France gets ⅓ of the Western shore of Hispaniola (Saint-Domingue, now Haiti)

    1724-1803: French government directly administers Saint-Domingue as its colony

    1785-1790: Peak of colonial era; approximately 30, 000 African slaves are imported each year to Saint-Domingue (slave population of about 500, 000 by outbreak of the slave uprising)

    1789: Beginning of the French Revolution, hostilities explode in Saint-Domingue between (and among) whites and the gens de couleurs 

    1791 (21August): Bois-Caiman Voodoo Ceremony?

    1791 (22 August): Slave uprising begins (first in the North)

    1793: Gradual abolition of slavery in Saint-Domingue via French commissioners Sonthonax and Polverel

    1794 (4 February): National Convention abolishes slavery in all French possessions 

    1794-1801: Louverture rises to power in Saint-Domingue

    1795: Treaty of Basel – Spain cedes Santo-Domingo to France

    1801 (January): Louverture campaigns in Santo-Domingo, now part of the French Empire 

    1801 (July); Louverture’s Constitution, partly in reaction to Napoleon seizing power in France 

    1801 (November): Moïse rebellion against Louverture

    1802: Napoleon’s Leclerc expedition 

    1803 (November): French capitulation, Battle of Vertières

    1804 (1 January): Haiti proclaims her independence; Jean-Jacques Dessalines becomes the first leader

    1806 (October): Assassination of Dessalines

    1807-1820: Henri Christophe succeeds Dessalines

    1807/11-1820: Haiti secedes between a kingdom in the North (governed by Christophe) and a Republic in the South (presided by Pétion)

    1811: Henri Christophe crowns himself Henry 1er, governs the North of Haiti as kingdom until his suicide in 1820

    1807-1818: Alexandre Pétion becomes president of Southern Haiti until his death in 1818

    1818-1843: Jean-Pierre Boyer is president of Haiti

    1820: Boyer reunites the two Haitis after the death of Henri Christophe; annexes the Dominican Republic

    1825: Indemnity to France for recognition of independence, originally 150M Francs (at 1789 values)

    1826: Boyer’s (particularly unpopular) Rural Code

    1838: Indemnity reduced to 90M, advantage tariffs for French commerce maintained

    1843: “Liberal” Revolt against Boyer

    1844: Dominican Republic declares independence from Haiti (and in1864 from Spain)

    1844: Piquet Rebellion 

    1844-1915: With few notable exceptions, beginning of a period of political instability

    1849-1859: Faustin Soulouque becomes president and crowns himself emperor of Haiti

    1879-1888: Presidency of Lysius Salomon

    1890s-1915: Greatest period of political instability, sovereignty undermined, less Haitian-owned businesses, social classes tighten; “color question” intensify 

    1915-1934: US Marine Occupation, puppet presidencies to serve US and elite interests 

    1917-1929: Cacos Wars againts the US Occupation

    1919: Death of Caco leader Charlemagne Peralte, photo of dead body paraded by Americans to discourage further resistance 

    1920s: Emergence of the Haitian Indigéniste movement

    1928: Haitian intellectual Jean Price-Mars publishes Ainsi Parla L’Oncle and strongly criticizes the Haitian elite for their lack of social usefulness 

    1930s: “Color question” intensify further; Marine occupation seen as an humiliation  

    1934: Departure of Americans, yet political ties remain

    1934: Creation of the Haitian Communist Party with members such as Jacques Roumain

    1930s-1940s: Noirisme movement “grows out” of Indigénisme

    1946: “Revolution of 1946”; victory of Noirisme movement; election of Dumarsais Estimé 

    1950: Coup against Estimé

    1950-1956: Presidency of Paul Eugène Magloire

    1957: Election of 1957; François Duvalier becomes president

    1957-1986: Duvalier Dictatorship 

    1964: François Duvalier names himself president for life (until 1971)

    1971-1986: Jean-Claude succeeds his father as next dictator of Haiti

    1986: End of Duvalier dictatorship

    1986-?: Interminable transition to democracy

    * Please do not copy this list without permission from its authors, that is, both moderators at HH and universalayititoma. Use for educational purposes only. 

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 

    REFERENCES:

    Fick, Carolyn E. The Making of Haiti: The Saint Domingue Revolution from Below. Univ. of Tennessee Press, 1990.

    Fischer, Sibylle. Modernity Disavowed: Haiti and the Cultures of Slavery in the Age of Revolution. Duke University Press, 2004.

    Frostin, Charles. Les révoltes blanches à Saint-Domingue aux XVIIe et XVIIIe siècles (Haïti avant 1789). Ecole, 1975.

    Geggus, David Patrick. Haitian Revolutionary Studies. Indiana University Press, 2002.

    James, C. L. R. The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L’ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution. Penguin Books Limited, 2001.

    Landers, Jane, and Barry Robinson. Slaves, Subjects, and Subversives: Blacks in Colonial Latin America. UNM Press, 2006.

    Leyburn, James G. The Haitian People, by James G. Leyburn, Yale University Press, 1948.

    Oliver, Jose R. Caciques and Cemi Idols: The Web Spun by Taino Rulers Between Hispaniola and Puerto Rico. University of Alabama Press, 2009.

    Stone, Erin Woodruff. “America’s First Slave Revolt: Indians and African Slaves in Española, 1500–1534.” Ethnohistory 60, no. 2 (March 20, 2013): 195–217. doi:10.1215/00141801-2018927.

    Trouillot, Michel-Rolph. Haiti, State Against Nation: The Origins and Legacy of Duvalierism. Monthly Review Press, 1990.

    Wilson, Samuel M. Hispaniola: Caribbean Chiefdoms in the Age of Columbus. University of Alabama Press, 1990. 

    Reblogged from: haitianhistory
  8. 
“Perhaps we Haitians should tell the whole world that being the FIRST BLACK NATION is no walk in the park and we have the scars to prove it.” - Woodring Saint Preux
Today, every Haitian household, whether in a permanent home or under a tent, will be making, drinking, and sharing some Soup Joumou. It is a symbol of our strength…Haiti will survive!
It is not a coincidence that “Soup Joumou” is consumed in every Haitian household all over the world on January 1st of every year. This symbol is the last symbol of unity and freedom we have left. We make Soup Joumou every New Year…We eat Soup Joumou every New Year…We share Soup Joumou every New Year…
We do it EVERY JANUARY 1st of every New Year in order to remember our past, our struggle for FREEDOM, and our ongoing fight to remain free. What better way to celebrate the New Year than with the very soup that we were not allowed to drink as slaves?
The most important New Year Celebration in Haitians history is New Year’s Day, January 1, 1804. We fought for nearly thirteen years before this day so that we could initiate this symbol of freedom for ALL slaves ALL over the world. Before 1804, A Haitian slave was NOT allowed to touch Joumou, a delicious and aromatic pumpkin that was a favorite for her white French master. Haitian Slave Diet: He/She was to eat one ounce of salted meat or fish and one bottle of lemonade per day. When our ancestors finally kicked the French out of the island, The Party was on! We fought the French and we won!
Read more: Bonne Année – Soup Joumou A Symbol of Haitian Independence Day | L’union Suite)

    “Perhaps we Haitians should tell the whole world that being the FIRST BLACK NATION is no walk in the park and we have the scars to prove it.” - Woodring Saint Preux

    Today, every Haitian household, whether in a permanent home or under a tent, will be making, drinking, and sharing some Soup Joumou. It is a symbol of our strength…Haiti will survive!

    It is not a coincidence that “Soup Joumou” is consumed in every Haitian household all over the world on January 1st of every year. This symbol is the last symbol of unity and freedom we have left. We make Soup Joumou every New Year…We eat Soup Joumou every New Year…We share Soup Joumou every New Year…

    We do it EVERY JANUARY 1st of every New Year in order to remember our past, our struggle for FREEDOM, and our ongoing fight to remain free. What better way to celebrate the New Year than with the very soup that we were not allowed to drink as slaves?

    The most important New Year Celebration in Haitians history is New Year’s Day, January 1, 1804. We fought for nearly thirteen years before this day so that we could initiate this symbol of freedom for ALL slaves ALL over the world. Before 1804, A Haitian slave was NOT allowed to touch Joumou, a delicious and aromatic pumpkin that was a favorite for her white French master. Haitian Slave Diet: He/She was to eat one ounce of salted meat or fish and one bottle of lemonade per day. When our ancestors finally kicked the French out of the island, The Party was on! We fought the French and we won!

    Read more: Bonne Année – Soup Joumou A Symbol of Haitian Independence Day | L’union Suite)

  9. Chinwa: The Untold Story of Chinese-Haitians

    Chinese presence in the Caribbean is concentrated mostly in Jamaica, but did you know that at one point there was a trickle of immigration from China into Haiti?
    With last names like Wu, Wah, Wawa, Fung, Fong-Ging, Fungcap, the first known Chinese families arrived in Haiti in the late 1890s, fleeing crumbling dynasties.
    Guy Fong-Ging, whose father King Fong-Ging adopted Haiti as his permanent home, says: “Fong Sam, Fong Wong, They came in groups. They were all [mostly] from the same family.”
    Some like Soud Fungcap arrived in Haiti in the Twentieth Century. Fungcap was on his way to Brazil, fleeing a revolution in China, when he accidentally landed in Haiti in 1915 and made his home there. Like other newly arrived immigrants from China, Soud kept in touch with the folks back home in Canton, China, and his son joined him in Haiti in 1928.

    Click link to read more

  10. The Battle of Vertieres (Kreyòl: Batay Vètyè; French: Bataille de Vertières), a defining campaign in the Haitian revolution, took place on November 18, 1803. In this clash, south of Le Cap Haitians led by Jean-Jacques Dessalines and Alexandre Pétion ultimately defeated the French troops under General Rochambeau.

    This last large battle of the Haitian Revolution, the Haitian War of Independence, was fought between Haitian rebels and French expeditionary forces. This decisive blow was a major loss for France and it’s colonial empire.

    Haitians led by Jean-Jacques Dessalines and François Capois attacked a strong French-held fort of Vertières, near Cap François (in the north of Haiti) and won a decisive victory over French colonial army under General Comte de Rochambeau and forced him to capitulate the same night.

    The Haitian Ninth Brigade under François Capois played a crucial role in the victory and caused Napoléon’s troops to abandon their stronghold. This battle occurred less than two months before Dessalines declaration of independence (On January 1, 1804) and delivered the final blow to the French attempt to re-institute slavery, as had been the case in the other Caribbean possesions, and to stop the Haitian Revolution.

    Another leader of the fight at Vértieres was Louis Michel Pierrot, the husband of the mambo Cécile Fatiman who had led the vodou ceremonies at Bois Caïman on August 14, 1791 together with Boukman.

    November 18 has been celebrated since then as the Bataille de Vertières day (Battle of Vertières’ Day) this day also used to be Armed Forces Day (French: Jour Des Forces Armées) in Haiti.

  11. Haitians in the 50s 
(Via Amour Creole on FB)

    Haitians in the 50s
    (Via Amour Creole on FB)

  12. soulbrotherv2:

Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois
The first and only successful slave revolution in the Americas began in 1791 when thousands of brutally exploited slaves rose up against their masters on Saint-Domingue, the most profitable colony in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. Within a few years, the slave insurgents forced the French administrators of the colony to emancipate them, a decision ratified by revolutionary Paris in 1794. This victory was a stunning challenge to the order of master/slave relations throughout the Americas, including the southern United States, reinforcing the most fervent hopes of slaves and the worst fears of masters.
But, peace eluded Saint-Domingue as British and Spanish forces attacked the colony. A charismatic ex-slave named Toussaint Louverture came to France’s aid, raising armies of others like himself and defeating the invaders. Ultimately Napoleon, fearing the enormous political power of Toussaint, sent a massive mission to crush him and subjugate the ex-slaves. After many battles, a decisive victory over the French secured the birth of Haiti and the permanent abolition of slavery from the land. The independence of Haiti reshaped the Atlantic world by leading to the French sale of Louisiana to the United States and the expansion of the Cuban sugar economy.
Laurent Dubois weaves the stories of slaves, free people of African descent, wealthy whites, and French administrators into an unforgettable tale of insurrection, war, heroism, and victory. He establishes the Haitian Revolution as a foundational moment in the history of democracy and human rights. [book link]

    soulbrotherv2:

    Avengers of the New World: The Story of the Haitian Revolution by Laurent Dubois

    The first and only successful slave revolution in the Americas began in 1791 when thousands of brutally exploited slaves rose up against their masters on Saint-Domingue, the most profitable colony in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world. Within a few years, the slave insurgents forced the French administrators of the colony to emancipate them, a decision ratified by revolutionary Paris in 1794. This victory was a stunning challenge to the order of master/slave relations throughout the Americas, including the southern United States, reinforcing the most fervent hopes of slaves and the worst fears of masters.

    But, peace eluded Saint-Domingue as British and Spanish forces attacked the colony. A charismatic ex-slave named Toussaint Louverture came to France’s aid, raising armies of others like himself and defeating the invaders. Ultimately Napoleon, fearing the enormous political power of Toussaint, sent a massive mission to crush him and subjugate the ex-slaves. After many battles, a decisive victory over the French secured the birth of Haiti and the permanent abolition of slavery from the land. The independence of Haiti reshaped the Atlantic world by leading to the French sale of Louisiana to the United States and the expansion of the Cuban sugar economy.

    Laurent Dubois weaves the stories of slaves, free people of African descent, wealthy whites, and French administrators into an unforgettable tale of insurrection, war, heroism, and victory. He establishes the Haitian Revolution as a foundational moment in the history of democracy and human rights. [book link]

    Reblogged from: soulbrotherv2
  13. tontonmichel:

The Parisiana situated at the Champ de Mars, from 1914.
The Parisiana was the first large cinema theater (with around 500 seats) in the country. In 1933, the Ciné Eden opened its doors in Cap-Haitien. The following year, Paramount opened in Port-au Prince, and in 1935 the Rex Theater was founded, also in the capital. It was consumed by fire set by an arsonist on the morning of April 30, 1930

    tontonmichel:

    The Parisiana situated at the Champ de Mars, from 1914.

    The Parisiana was the first large cinema theater (with around 500 seats) in the country. In 1933, the Ciné Eden opened its doors in Cap-Haitien. The following year, Paramount opened in Port-au Prince, and in 1935 the Rex Theater was founded, also in the capital.
    It was consumed by fire set by an arsonist on the morning of April 30, 1930

    Reblogged from: tontonmichel
  14. 7 year old Jayden explaining Haitian Independence Day (by Corlyce Oreus)

  15. November 18, 1803 - Battle of Vertières (Batay Vètyè)

    Haitian five Gourdes banknote from 1989, depicting the monument to the Battle of Vertières located just south of Cap-Haïtien.

    The Battle of Vertieres (Kreyòl: Batay Vètyè; French: Bataille de Vertières), a defining campaign in the Haitian revolution, took place on November 18, 1803. In this clash, south of Le Cap Haitians led by Jean-Jacques Dessalines and Alexandre Pétion ultimately defeated the French troops under General Rochambeau.

    This last large battle of the Haitian Revolution, the Haitian War of Independence, was fought between Haitian rebels and French expeditionary forces. This decisive blow was a major loss for France and it’s colonial empire.

    Haitians led by Jean-Jacques Dessalines and François Capois attacked a strong French-held fort of Vertières, near Cap François (in the north of Haiti) and won a decisive victory over French colonial army under General Comte de Rochambeau and forced him to capitulate the same night.

    The Haitian Ninth Brigade under François Capois played a crucial role in the victory and caused Napoléon’s troops to abandon their stronghold. This battle occurred less than two months before Dessalines declaration of independence (On January 1, 1804) and delivered the final blow to the French attempt to re-institute slavery, as had been the case in the other Caribbean possesions, and to stop the Haitian Revolution.

    Another leader of the fight at Vértieres was Louis Michel Pierrot, the husband of the mambo Cécile Fatiman who had led the vodou ceremonies at Bois Caïman on August 14, 1791 together with Boukman.

    November 18 has been celebrated since then as the Bataille de Vertières day (Battle of Vertières’ Day) this day also used to be Armed Forces Day (French: Jour Des Forces Armées) in Haiti.

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